Factoring Changing Weather Patterns Into Investment Decisions

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA – AUGUST 29: Utility workers play in the wind from Hurricane Ida as they wait for the storm to pass to begin repairs on August 29, 2021, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Ida made landfall earlier today southwest of New Orleans. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Extreme weather events like Hurricane Ida are occurring with greater frequency causing damage to buildings, businesses, power lines, roads and more, stemming conversations about climate change and our impact on the environment and how such considerations should factor into investment decisions. “AccuWeather estimates that the price tag for Ida’s damage could reach $95 billion,” says founder, George Schultze in his most recent @Forbes blog post. Investors should keep this in mind when analyzing companies in certain sectors. Read the full post here:

Forbes 9.16.21

Universal Basic Income, Student Loan Forgiveness, and Crypto Craziness—Too Good To Be True?

A computer screen displays a site featuring cryptocurrency token sales and ICO (Initial Coin Offering) lists in Berlin on November 26, 2017. – Bypassing oversight of any kind, Initial Coin Offerings (ICOs) have sprung from nowhere to become a hugely popular way for start-ups to raise funds online, offering self-created digital “tokens” or coins to any willing buyer. (Photo by John MACDOUGALL / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP via Getty Images)

George Schultze, says right now the economy seems “too good to be true.” Student loan debt relief has been extended until January 2022, pilot programs such as Universal Basic Income (UBI) are giving out payments to California residents up to $600/month and the new Child Tax Credit promises to deliver up to $3,600 to families and children. Read more n George’s insights, including his thoughts on crypto in @Forbes:

Forbes 8.18.21

Decline in Defaults Doesn’t Mean We’re Back to Normal

Basement of a bank full of banknotes, at the time of the Mark devaluation, during the economic crisis, Weimar Republic (Germany), 1923. (Photo by Albert Harlingue/Roger Viollet via Getty Images)

In the past, low defaults rates usually signal that it’s a good time to invest in post-distress companies, and while that’s still probably true, it’s more important than ever for investors to carefully consider the risks before making such a move,” says George Schultze. This month, he shares his insights in Forbes on inflation, looking at the housing market, government spending, consumer savings and personal consumption

Forbes 7.13.21

Are the Apes Now Running Wall Street?

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – MAY 25: A kid poses next to the Fearless Girl statue outside the New York Stock Exchange during the coronavirus pandemic on May 25, 2020 in New York City. Government guidelines encourage wearing a mask in public with strong social distancing in effect as all 50 states in the USA have begun a gradual process to slowly reopen after weeks of stay-at-home measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. (Photo by Noam Galai/Getty Images)

The investing game is changing. CEO George Schultze discusses meme stocks such as AMC, which almost went bankrupt and now has a market capitalization of $41 million, along with GameStop that can move the index in any given day. Read more about the evolving investing space in his Forbes article:

Forbes 6.15.21

When a Pair of Sneakers Sells for Almost $2 Million, Can Inflation Be Far Behind?

LOS ANGELES, CA – FEBRUARY 10: Rapper Kanye West on stage at the 50th Annual GRAMMY Awards at the Staples Center on February 10, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Lester Cohen/WireImage)

In CEO George Schultze’s recent Forbes blog post, he cautions investors to beware of post-COVID optimism with several asset bubbles in place right now. Read more of his thoughts on inflation here:

Forbes 5.14.21