Decline in Defaults Doesn’t Mean We’re Back to Normal

Basement of a bank full of banknotes, at the time of the Mark devaluation, during the economic crisis, Weimar Republic (Germany), 1923. (Photo by Albert Harlingue/Roger Viollet via Getty Images)

In the past, low defaults rates usually signal that it’s a good time to invest in post-distress companies, and while that’s still probably true, it’s more important than ever for investors to carefully consider the risks before making such a move,” says George Schultze. This month, he shares his insights in Forbes on inflation, looking at the housing market, government spending, consumer savings and personal consumption

Forbes 7.13.21

Are the Apes Now Running Wall Street?

NEW YORK, NEW YORK – MAY 25: A kid poses next to the Fearless Girl statue outside the New York Stock Exchange during the coronavirus pandemic on May 25, 2020 in New York City. Government guidelines encourage wearing a mask in public with strong social distancing in effect as all 50 states in the USA have begun a gradual process to slowly reopen after weeks of stay-at-home measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. (Photo by Noam Galai/Getty Images)

The investing game is changing. CEO George Schultze discusses meme stocks such as AMC, which almost went bankrupt and now has a market capitalization of $41 million, along with GameStop that can move the index in any given day. Read more about the evolving investing space in his Forbes article:

Forbes 6.15.21

When a Pair of Sneakers Sells for Almost $2 Million, Can Inflation Be Far Behind?

LOS ANGELES, CA – FEBRUARY 10: Rapper Kanye West on stage at the 50th Annual GRAMMY Awards at the Staples Center on February 10, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Lester Cohen/WireImage)

In CEO George Schultze’s recent Forbes blog post, he cautions investors to beware of post-COVID optimism with several asset bubbles in place right now. Read more of his thoughts on inflation here:

Forbes 5.14.21